Downtown Las Vegas, Drink Locally, Happy Hour, Happy Hour Las Vegas, Lounges & Bars, Neighborhood & Local, Nightclubs, Restaurants, The Strip

Las Vegas Happy Hour + The Happy Hour Gang = Happiness!

We are so excited about our upcoming meeting that we have been double dog daring the days to go faster!

A few months ago we reached out to Las Vegas Happy Hour.  They have an amazing website that list happy hour times and locations by neighborhood!  THEY ARE AWESOME!

border

But that’s not all that makes us happy….they are going to stop by our next meeting at Landry’s!  EEP!

Ok Wayne & Garth you can stop now.  No guys, seriously. stop. You’re giving us a headache.

You can RSVP for our next meeting here: eventbrite_monogram

Or find us on the book of face here: facebook

border

Downtown Las Vegas, Drink Locally, Experience, Happy Hour, Happy Hour Las Vegas, Lounges & Bars, Scared Scotchless, Scotch and Whiskey, Social Drinking

This is Not a Rant

Is whisky a drink? Funny to be asking this, isn’t it? I mean isn’t it obvious that whisky is a beverage? And yet there are investors who buy and sell whisky to make money. At least one person has stated quite clearly that it isn’t a drink. And he’s right. Whisky is a commodity. As a commodity, it has a mysterious quality. It is not a physical property of the item. It is an intangible quality. Like the philosopher Slavoj Zizek has said about Coca-Cola, where the marketing of the product emphatically embraces this intangible quality in its advertisements. Coke is it. Coke is the real thing. Enjoy Coke. What is “it”? What is “the real thing”? Am I obligated to “enjoy” Coke? Does the same hold true for whisky?

When you read about whisky in its descriptions you’ll read all about how this whisky or Ardbeg-Corryvreckanthat was “handcrafted”  “in small batches,” as part of “a limited run” “restricted to x number of bottles” and this treatment will magically infuse the product with something not resulting from its distillation. It is rare. It is special. Possess the bottle and you will possess this something extra.

Drinkers often ask if a particular whisky is worth the extra money spent. That depends. Some whisky is matured for over two decades or more. The age on the bottle (if it has an age statement) is the age of the youngest whisky in the mix. Since it must be maintained for a longer time, the expense involved means that, in order to make a profit, more must be charged to the buyer. This is understandable, but from a taste perspective, this extra expense may not reflect it’s value as a drink meant to be consumed. A higher price tag doesn’t always mean the product tastes better. And in the case of purchasing for investment, the higher price may have nothing at all to do with its taste, but more of its value as a rare commodity.

Like the wine industry, where certain bottles go for thousands of dollars (or more), the wines meant to be consumed on a daily basis by true fans are likely to be some of the least expensive. If I like wine at lunch and dinner on a daily basis I cannot afford to drink high priced, or even moderately priced wines with every meal. The bottles that cost five dollars or so are meant to be enjoyed often. They may not be the best, but they are good, and more importantly can be enjoyed often without breaking the budget. There are similar offerings in the world of whisky, but usually for quite a bit more than five dollars.

But as a drinker of whisky, is it ever worth it to buy a bottle to be consumed once it has achieved investment status? Have the investors essentially destroyed the whisky’s value as a drink? More importantly, by making a particular whisky be rare so as to increase its appeal to the whisky brokers, are distillers catering not to drinkers, but rather to the investors and are thus making products made to be forever bought and sold but rarely consumed? or is this an unfortunate and unintended result?

Downtown Las Vegas, Happy Hour, Lounges & Bars, Neighborhood & Local, Social Drinking, Uncategorized

Downtown Cocktail Room

Tonight was the first planning meeting of the Happy Hour Gang. But due to illness, work, and new jobs I was the only one to show up.

image

This amazing little bar is hidden behind smoky glass and a steel door and if you blink you may miss it. Tonight’s crowd was small, as it is a Monday night, but everyone is pretty friendly and ready to share a story or two.

Davey the bartender from Ohio, by way of England and is eager to share information about the Brew of the Month. (Trust me, you’ll want to listen,  his accent is dreamy, but don’t ask him where he’s from. But do ask him about Absinthe, he’s a true aficionado on the drink. Plus his accent! )

This month’s brew is Kronenbourg 1664 Blanc. It’s wonderfully light and refreshingly orangey.  The last bit of the beer changes flavor with the yeast that settles at the bottom.  I highly recommend it when you stop in!

The bar itself is dark and cozy, with wonderful couches and is lit by red votives. It’s truly a locals bar,  but some visitors will find it while waiting for a table at a restaurant.  Such as the guy from Montana who lives in a town that has more Irish residents than Boston.  I said people like to share stories!

Stop by,  their happy hour is 4 to 8 pm.

Downtown Cocktail Room
111 S. Las Vegas Blvd.
Las Vegas Blvd. & Fremont

-Kina

image

image  image

 

Downtown Las Vegas, Lounges & Bars, Neighborhood & Local

The Mob Bar – He Who Pays Well is Well Served

It was a dark and stormy night, when she walked into the bar.  It was small swanky and filled the usual characters that are associated with a joint like that. She looked around until she saw him. He smiled a smile that can only mean one thing, trouble.

Ok , so it wasn’t raining or storming when I arrived at The Mob Bar, but it was swanky  and there was a guy in there that had a smile that meant trouble. It was only The Jerm, our host for this month’s meeting, waiting for everyone to arrive. We were excited to see what he had in store. First up was a questionnaire with great mob questions like: “Where in Vegas is the best place to hide a body?” and “Who in the group would be the best hitman?” the best part was the best Mobster impression! The winner got 4 cans of Chef Boyardi and $7.56.

The cocktail listing was standard, but it’s the ambiance that keeps this place exciting.  Many of the patrons got

into the spirit and dressed up, and the staff from the Mob Museum kept the place alive with laughter. Jazz music spilled over you while photos of screen starlets watch you drink. My favorite was the Espresso Martini, made with Van Gogh Double Espresso Vodka, Absolut Vanilla Vodka, Bailey’s, Irish Cream, and a Shot of Espresso. Be careful on these, you can drink two without a second thought! Yummy! You can see their full menu on their Facebook page.

Food at the Mob Bar is provided by one of my favorite places to eat downtown, The Triple George Grill. We feasted on Clams Casino, Spaghetti & Meatball Bites (a favorite of Panda P’s and Bloody Maria), Caprese Salad and the Chicken Parmesan Sliders – Paddy Wagon swears by them!  The prices are reasonable and the portions are enough to share with one person, so order two and you’ll be set.

All in all, it was a great time.  You can call or email the bar for

reservations to really make you feel like a Mob Boss; just confirm with them a day prior to jog their memory. The bartenders were dressed with white shirts bow ties and barters around their arm, but it was kind of sad to see that the wait staff was not dressed as they were highlighted on their FB page.

All in all it was a unanimous decision that the Mob Bar meeting was a huge success and we don’t want to see this joint swimmin’ with the fishes.  If you get my drift! So if you know what’s good for yous…take the offer.

Ki…ki…ki….Kina

Follow me on Twitter! 

Downtown Las Vegas, Lounges & Bars, Neighborhood & Local

The History of a Speakeasy

Of course this will lead to our next location, The Mob Bar.

A Speakeasy was an illicit liquor store or nightclub that operated during the Prohibition.  There’s been reports of  and estimated 100,000 locations in New York city by 1925.  According to the author of the Wikipedia entry;

“The term ‘speakeasy’ might have originated in Pennsylvania in 1888, when the Brooks High-License Act raised the state’s fee for a saloon license from $50 to $500. The number of licensed bars promptly plummeted, but some bars continued to operate illegally. Kate Hester had run a saloon for years in McKeesport, just outside of Pittsburgh. She refused to pay the new license fee and wanted to keep from drawing attention to her illegal business. When her customers got too rowdy, she would hush them by whispering, ‘Speak easy, boys! Speak easy!’  This expression became common in McKeesport and spread to Pittsburgh.”

We are hoping the Mob Bar lives up to the original spirit of the 1920’s speakeasy.  After our visit, we will review the venue here. If you would like to join us, here’s the link to the Facebook invitation.  To keep up with us, sign up for our email updates! Check the HHG Calendar page for dates and times for our next location!

If you have a place you would like us to visit, email us at HappyHourGangLV@gmail.com.

Until next time, Keep Calm and Get a Drink!

~KI..KI..KI..KINA